Supporters of Brendan Dassi are working to free the convicted murderer

The struggle for the release of Brendan Dassi continues. Dassi and his uncle Stephen Avery were convicted and convicted of the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach in Manitowoc County. Dassi was sentenced to life in prison, with the earliest opportunity for parole being in 2048. Years later, the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer” is still in vogue around the world. “I watched the documentary like everyone else and felt really compelled to try to do something to help him,” said Becca Nash, who lives in Arizona and started a Facebook group called Brendan Talks. Nash set up the group so that people could help her lift Dassi’s spirits in prison and try to get the deputies to release him. Nash said he talked to Dassi every week on the phone. They never met in person. “I’ve known him for six or seven years, so I consider him a good friend at the moment,” Nash said. “We are talking about movies, music. He loves Pokemon, anime, manga. We’ve been to Wisconsin supporters’ rallies for Dassi, and she regularly administers activities for her Facebook group to participate. Things like eating Dassi’s favorite foods, sending photos from their art contests and lighting candles in his name. “He’s very kind, very sweet, he wouldn’t hurt anyone,” Nash said. “I believe he is 100% innocent.” Nash also makes hundreds of postcards for people to send to lawmakers, such as the governor. Tony Evers, trying to free Dassi. So far, Nash has said she has made more than 500 postcards. Another member of the group, Elizabeth Graf-Ketler, lives in Bristol, Kenosha County. She said she learned about Dassi’s case after watching a Netflix documentary. “To me, it’s like horrible violence against children,” said Graf-Kettler. “I mean, here’s a kid. He knows he is innocent. No one is looking to help him. ”She is referring to Dassi’s confession records with the police, who she said forced him to say what he wanted. “We went there, tied her up. He stabbed her and told me to cut her throat,” Dassi can be heard in the recorded confession. Count Kettler keeps a picture of Dassi with the picture in the frame of her deceased son. She said she has been writing to Dassi and Evers for years. “I’ve had so many sleepless nights thinking about this child,” said Graf-Kettler. “Worried about what they’re doing to him and what’s causing him mentally?” In 2019, Dassi was denied the right to pardon. “I was sitting there crying,” said Count-Kettler. “I said, ‘Oh my God, what more could they do for this child and his family?’ An Evers spokesman said that since taking office in 2019, the governor has received 2,200 contacts regarding Dassi’s case. People like Graf-Ketler and Nash who are personally invested. “Do I think a postcard will change the mind of (Evers)?” Probably not, but I want him to know that there are people all over America, all over the world, who believe that a great injustice has been done and that he must correct it, “Nash said. A spokesman for Evers’ office said the pardon’s eligibility criteria had not changed in Dassi’s case and Evers was not currently considering changes to the sentence.

The struggle for the release of Brendan Dassi continues.

Dassi and his uncle Stephen Avery were convicted and convicted of the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach in Manitowoc County.

Dassi was sentenced to life in prison, with the earliest opportunity for parole being in 2048.

Years later, the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer” still resonates with people around the world.

“I watched the documentary like everyone else and felt really compelled to try to do something to help him,” said Becca Nash, who lives in Arizona and started a Facebook group called Brendan Talks.

Nash set up the group so that people could help her lift Dassi’s spirits in prison and try to get the deputies to release him.

Nash said he talked to Dassi every week on the phone. They never met in person.

“I’ve known him for six or seven years, so I consider him a good friend at the moment,” Nash said. “We talk about movies, music. He loves Pokemon, anime, manga. We talk about TV shows he likes.”

She has been to supporters of Wisconsin supporters for Dassey and regularly administers activities for her Facebook group to participate. Things like eating Dassi’s favorite foods, sending photos from their art contests and lighting candles in his name.

“He’s very kind, very sweet, he wouldn’t hurt anyone,” Nash said. “I believe he is 100% innocent.”

Nash also makes hundreds of postcards for people to send to MPs, such as the governor. Tony Evers, trying to free Dassi. So far, Nash has said she has made more than 500 postcards.

Another member of the group, Elizabeth Graf-Ketler, lives in Bristol, Kenosha County. She said she learned about Dassi’s case after watching a Netflix documentary.

“To me, it’s like horrible violence against children,” said Graf-Kettler. “I mean, here’s a child. He knows he’s innocent. Nobody’s looking to help him.”

She is referring to Dassi’s confession records with the police, who she said persuaded him to say what he wanted.

“We went there, tied her up. He stabbed her and told me to cut her throat,” Dassi can be heard in the recorded confession.

Count Kettler keeps a picture of Dassi with the picture in the frame of her deceased son. She said she has been writing to Dassi and Evers for years.

“I’ve had so many sleepless nights thinking about this child,” said Graf-Kettler. “Worried about what they’re doing to him and what’s causing him mentally?”

In 2019, Dassi’s right to pardon was denied.

“I was sitting there crying,” said Count-Kettler. I said, “Oh God, what more could they do to this child and his family?”

An Evers spokesman said that since taking office in 2019, the governor has received 2,200 contacts regarding Dassi’s case.

People like Graf-Ketler and Nash who are personally invested.

“Do I think a postcard will change the mind of (Evers)?” Probably not, but I want him to know that there are people all over America, all over the world, who believe that a great injustice has been done and that he must correct it, “Nash said.

A spokesman for Evers’ office said the pardon’s eligibility criteria had not changed in Dassi’s case and Evers was not currently considering changing the sentence.

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