SpaceX completes the falcon 9 launch

SpaceX launched the Globalstar FM15 into space during the third of three launches, spanning just over 36 hours. Credit: Teresa Cross / Spaceflight Insider

Over the weekend, SpaceX launched three Falcon 9 rockets on both shores of the United States in just over 36 hours.

The three launches began in Florida on Friday with a batch of Starlink satellites. This was followed by the German satellite SARAh-1 about 24 hours later at 10:19 AM EDT (14:19 UTC) on June 18 in California, before finishing again in Florida with the launch of Globalstar-2 FM15 at 12: 27:00 EDT (04:27 UTC) 19 June.

On June 17, SpaceX's Falcon 9, using the B1060 primary core, flew for the 13th time, sending 53 Starlink satellites into orbit.  Credit: Teresa Cross / Spaceflight Insider

On June 17, SpaceX’s Falcon 9, using the B1060 primary core, flew for the 13th time, sending 53 Starlink satellites into orbit. Credit: Teresa Cross / Spaceflight Insider

Each launch took place at separate sites: the Kennedy Space Center launch complex 39A, the Vandenberg Space Forces launch complex 4E and the Cape Canaveral space force space launch complex 40.

This set of three consecutive launches set the record for the fastest triple start of any vendor in history in just 36 hours and 18 minutes. according to CBS News.

Launch on Friday – the first in the series – was also the first time SpaceX released a first-stage Falcon 9 core on its 13th flight. He successfully landed down in the Atlantic Ocean and will probably be prepared for the 14th flight.

The second launch in a row orbits the SARah-1 radar reconnaissance satellite, built by Airbus Defense and Space and operated by the German armed forces, with the intention of replacing the constellation SAR-LUPE, which the German government is currently using for reconnaissance.

This constellation will eventually be replaced by SARAh-1, as well as by SARAh-2 and SARAh-3 satellites. Each is fixed with an antenna array that will help increase the resolution of the SAR constellation (synthetic aperture radar), better than that of the main SAR-lupe.

SARAh-1 is powered by two solar panels.

Used in the SARah-1 mission, the first-stage Falcon 9 B1071 core returned to SpaceX’s LZ-4 landing area in Vandenberg after the client’s payload was successfully launched. This was the third landing for this booster.

The Falcon 9 core Core B1071 returns to California after its role in launching SARah-1 on June 18th.  Credit: SpaceX

The Falcon 9 core Core B1071 returns to California after its role in launching SARah-1 on June 18th. Credit: SpaceX

The third launch in the sequence orbits the Globalstar-2 satellite for Globalstar.

Globalstar satellites are designed to provide real-time digital voice, data and fax transmission worldwide. The satellites are built by Alcatel Alenia Space and are powered by two unfolding solar arrays.

This particular satellite has a mass of only about 700 kilograms – within the capabilities of the Falcon 9 rocket.

Credit: Teresa Cross / Spaceflight Insider

Credit: Teresa Cross / Spaceflight Insider

There has been some speculation that there may have been additional payloads on board this flight. Typically, for a primary payload such as Globalstar-2, the first stage will have enough residual performance to return to a landing pad. Instead, however, he landed on a drone.

In addition, the payload distributor seen in the live webcast shows that the satellite is located radially and not in accordance with the second stage. In addition, this launch was publicly added to the manifesto relatively recently, according to an FCC filing in early June.

SpaceX did not mention any other payloads during its live broadcast of the launch.

This mission uses the first core B1061, which was on its ninth flight. After taking part in the ascent, he burned and entered the landing to land on the SpaceX Just Read the Instruction drone, located down in the Atlantic Ocean. This was the 126th booster landing for the company, setting a record 52 consecutive successful landings.

Overall, these three launches represent Falcon 9’s 158th, 159th and 160th flights since its debut in 2010 and the 24th, 25th and 26th launches in 2022 alone.

So far in 2022, the company is releasing an average of one Falcon 9 every 6.5 days. SpaceX is set to launch between 50 and 60 missions before the end of this year.

Video courtesy of SpaceX

Tagged: Falcon 9 Globalstar Leading stories SAR-1 SpaceX Starlink

Teresa Cross

Teresa Cross grew up on Space Coast. It is quite natural for her to develop a passion for everything “Space” and its exploration. During these years of formation, she also discovered that she had the talent and love to define the unique oddities and complexities that exist in humanity, nature and machines. Hailing from a family of photographers, including her father and son, Teresa herself began documenting her world through photographs at a very early age. As an adult, she already has an innate photographic ability to combine what attracts her heart and her love of technology to provide a diverse approach to her work and art presentations. Teresa has experience in aquatic chemistry, fluid dynamics and industrial utility.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.